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The Owner Builder 193 February/March 2016 is now on sale nationwide.

This issue includes a council approved cordwood home in Tas, building a bottle wall in NT, a family home built of timber in SA, owner builder regulations and much more… See the website for more details.

The extract article this issue is about the cordwood home in Tasmania. The full article can be viewed on our website:  ‘The House That Worked Out‘, as well as in the sample issue extract. The images from the article are included below.

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The Owner Builder 192 December 2015/January 2016 is on sale nationwide from 28 November 2015.

This issue includes a Knox-inspired mud brick, straw bale tilt up panel system, domes built using rice husk bags, owner builder regulations and much more… See the website for more details.

The extract article this issue is about a straw bale build in Victoria. The full article can be viewed on our website:  ‘Nestled amongst red ironbarks‘, as well as in the sample issue extract. The images from the article are included below.

The Owner Builder 191 October/November 2015 is on sale nationwide from 29 September 2015.

This issue includes a peaceful bush hut retreat in Tasmania, rocket mass heaters, a solar home in NZ built with recycled materials, owner builder regulations and much more… See the website for more details.

The extract article this issue is about rocket mass heaters and rocket stoves. The full article can be viewed on our website:  ‘Rocket mass heaters‘, as well as in the sample issue extract. The images from the article are included below.

The Owner Builder 190 August/September 2015 is on sale nationwide from 29 July 2015.

This issue includes an eclectic mud brick and timber home in NSW, lessons on owner building, a 10 star zero energy home in Qld, owner builder regulations and much more… See the website for more details.

The extract article this issue is about the artistic mud and timber family home in a secluded NSW valley. The full article can be viewed on our website:  Mud, wood and ‘jewels’, as well as in the sample issue extract on issuu. The images from the article are included below.

Under the First Home Owner Grant (FHOG) Scheme, a one-off grant is payable to first home owners that satisfy all the eligibility criteria.

This is a summary of eligibility points and contacts by state for building of new homes with commencements as at 1 July 2015. If you commenced your project before this date or are still to commence, please check the details that apply as at your date of project commencement.

Transfer duty concessions/exemptions may also apply. Applications are to be lodged within 12 months of completion. Each state differs slightly so check your relevant state requirements carefully.

First home owner grant

Australian Capital Territory

  • FHOG $12,500
  • Market value not to exceed $750,000

ACT FHOG

New South Wales

  • FHOG $15,000 ($10,000 from 1 January 2016)
  • Market value not to exceed $750,000

NSW FHOG

Northern Territory

  • FHOG $26,000
  • Market value not to exceed $600,000

NT FHOG

Queensland

  • Great Start Grant $15,000
  • Market value not to exceed $750,000

QLD FHOG

South Australia

  • FHOG $15,000
  • Market value not to exceed $575,000

SA FHOG

Tasmania

  • First Home Owners Boost to $20,000
  • No market value limit

TAS FHOG

Victoria

  • FHOG $10,000
  • Market value not to exceed $750,000

VIC FHOG

Western Australia

  • FHOG $10,000
  • Market value not to exceed $750,000/$1,000,000 (depending on location)

WA FHOG

 

The National Construction Code (NCC), comprising Volumes 1 (Commercial Buildings) and Volume 2 (Residential Buildings) of the Building Code of Australia plus Volume 3 (Plumbing Code of Australia), is now available for FREE online.

 

2015_Vol2

 

To make sure your work is compliant, register online and you will be able to download the volumes of the NCC that you require (44MB in size for all).

These used to cost up to $500 – so this is amazing!

The UK has a more ‘advanced’ approach to owner building, or self building as they call it, with a Government endorsed National Custom & Self Build Association (NACSBA), who provide a useful website The Self Build Portal.
The Self Build Portal
Of the various routes to building discussed, ‘Self build one-off home‘ is the one closest to the full owner builder experience.
‘You manage the design and construction process and undertake a fair proportion of the actual building work too.’
While some of the information and links are very UK specific, the overall process remains pretty similar to that in Australia.
They list the benefits:
  • It usually works out cheaper – saving typically 20-40%
  • You get what you want
  • You know the building inside-out and are sure it has been well built
and the challenges:
  • It is riskier – and unless you know what you are doing there is a chance you could make some costly mistakes
  • It is very hard work – you’ll be on site working long hours every day for many months
  • Building a home is complex and complicated, and there are lots of formal approvals and certification issues to wrestle with
 In addition to that list of benefits, I would add:
  • You can make changes relatively easily (within reason) on the go
  • It is possible to  build in a phased approach without undue penalty
  • It is possible to build a natural home, as it is not yet easy to find a builder of these homes in Australia
As for challenges, I think the one thing that could be added is:
  • You will experience lows as well as highs; having some support – either from a partner, friend or relative –  to bounce your frustrations off will be very useful.
Follow through to the original page for a lot more detail.
Above all, enjoy the journey!